Portfolio

In 2014, Dr. Susannah Ural asked me to develop an interactive map of the routes veterans from Hood’s Texas Brigade took home after their surrender at Appomattox Court House, Virginia. After months of mining the journals and memoirs, I created this interactive map using the Neatline software developed by the Scholar’s Lab at the University of Virginia Library.

This map conveys not only the length of the journey and the destruction caused by the Civil War, but the alacrity and resilience of youth in the wake of great hardship. Despite the human toll of the previous four years and their intense desire to get home, these young veterans still found time to go fishing, flirt with girls, and take in the sights. For many, this final march was only the beginning of a longer journey towards national reconciliation and personal healing. For others that day would never come. Please click on the image below to access “The Long Road Home.”

The Long Road Home
The Long Road Home
Portfolio

by Allan Branstiter

It has been twenty years since my dad received a box of magazines from a truck driver outside a plastic pipe factory in Muncy, Pennsylvania. Not every dad would accept a beaten box of glossy mags from a trucker, and even fewer would bestow said box upon their 12-year-old son. But my dad did, and in doing so kicked off what became a life-long interest in the history of the American Civil War. I remember the event vividly: Dad pulling up in his Ford Ranger just after dinner, the soft sides of a heavy cardboard box straining to contain its contents, and the colorful images of soldiers fighting and dying upon the shining covers of the innumerable issues of Civil War Times Illustrated staring back at me as I deposited them all over my bedroom floor.

Cpl. Joseph Pierce, 1862
Cpl. Joseph Pierce, 1862

Of the thousands of pages I would eventually read about the Civil War as a boy, a single page stands out in my memory more than the rest. On the final page of many issues of Civil War Times Illustrated during the early 1990s, the editors would dedicate a page to the life of individual veterans of the Civil War. One was set aside for Joseph Pierce, the adopted Chinese son of a sea captain who served in the 14th Connecticut Infantry at Gettysburg. Pierce’s image currently hangs in the Gettysburg Museum; however, few people knew about him twenty years ago. When I first discovered him, Joseph Pierce’s existence unsettled me for reasons that took me years to understand. I remember that moment clearly. Pierce’s Asian face stared up from the page at my Asian face—two brown bodies surrounded by a sea of white culture and white history.

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College and Grad School, Portfolio

by Allan Branstiter

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I had very little experience reading scholarly books when I was an undergraduate, and this put me at a disadvantage when I started graduate school. A typical graduate history course requires students to read one book and two articles a week. Considering the fact that a full-time grad student is enrolled in three or four classes a semester, they can face weeks where they have to read over a thousand pages a week. Students must also produce a book review about every other week, not to mention research papers, historiographic essays, MA theses, and Ph.D. dissertations—which all require more reading.  My first week of graduate history classes was so intense that I actually threw my back out reading. Let’s just say posture and orthopedics matter when you spend endless hours at a desk reading and writing.

In this post I’ll give you my thoughts on the “Art of the Grad-Read” and how I read a book quickly and efficiently. Let me start out by saying that this advice is useful to both graduate students and undergraduate students. I really wish I had known how to read a book efficiently as an undergraduate instead of wasting my time either reading a book too thoroughly or too superficially.

This brings another point to mind: this post is about reading a book quickly and efficiently, but it won’t teach you how to “speed read.” Also remember that these tips are for reading scholarly non-fiction, not novels. Reading The Great Gatsby requires a different method of reading than reading The  Ideological Origins of the American Revolution. Finally, this method will not make you the foremost expert on any given book; instead, it aims to familiarize you enough with a book so you can discuss it in class, write a brief book review about it, and store it away in your mind for future reference. Reading a book for detail or finding leads on sources for your own research will require a different method, but this is a good place to start.

So how do graduate students read so much? Is it even humanly possible to read this many books and articles in a week? Actually, it is. And it’s really not that hard if you can break it down into a process and know exactly why you’re reading. By the time I finished my MA degree I was reading a 250-page book in about four hours. Any less than that left me feeling doubtful about my ability to talk about the book in class, and any more than that was for my own enjoyment. You’re time is invaluable to you as a graduate student, so learning how to efficiently read was central to my mental sanity and academic success during those years.

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Portfolio, Wrestling

by Allan Branstiter

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I spent most of last week writing my dissertation prospectus, so I wasn’t able to get to an idea I’ve been pondering for a few weeks. As I was working on constructing an argument about viewing the Civil War and Reconstruction era from the lens of American settler colonialism, Vann R. Newkirk at The Atlantic beat me to the punch and wrote a very good article about what professional wrestling can tell us about Donald Trump’s presidential campaign. You should definitely read it. And this. And this. While Newkirk argues that Trump’s success is based on his ability to play the heel (the overtly bad guy in a storyline), I argue that The Donald fits a more recent archetype: the “anti-heel” (i.e. Stone Cold Steve Austin, C.M. Punk, and Kevin Owens).

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Portfolio

Bizarro Gen-X Ted Cruz
Bizarro Gen-X Ted Cruz

by Allan Branstiter

During Marco Rubio’s triumphal bronze medal speech in Iowa he used the word “generation” seven times in less than a minute. I couldn’t help but wonder what generation he was trying to speak to. Rubio’s speech was more or less the rehearsed “New American Century” schtick he’s been polishing since last year, but last night speech was notable to me because it was an odd Frankenstein of Boomer sanctimony, Millennial idealism, and (more importantly) Gen X cynicism.

Boomer v. Millennial gets a ton of airtime these days (see: Weber, Meacham, Nentl, et al.), but this leads me to wonder if we are overlooking Generation X’s more silent influence over the 2016 Republican primary campaign? Let’s make the (wholly unscientific) case.

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